Greenwashing South Africa
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Ecozyme is a leading manufacturer and supplier biodegradable eco-friendly  chemicals, bacterial, probiotic, microbial and enzyme products for our rapidly growing distributor network, major blue chip companies per key sector in South Africa as well as for successful export around the world.

Greenwashing in South Africa

The term “greenwashing” is used when significantly more time and money has been spent advertising being green rather than spending resources on environmentally sound practices.

Many local companies import raw material concentrates which carry Eco Logos in Europe or the U.S. but then dishonestly try to ride on the back of these labels in South Africa claiming their products have been locally licensed and certified. Your bio-enzyme products should always be ethically registered in their country of productions by a trusted and independent body.


Many imported products contain substance called EDTA, a substance which is under serious environmental scrutiny, and EDTA has actually been banned by the Global Eco-Label Network! Ecozyme products are locally audited and tested by The Heritage Environmental Programme and carry the Eco-Choice logo, and are guaranteed to be EDTA free.


Greenwashing is often portrayed by changing the label of a product, to give the feeling of nature, for example putting an image of a forest on a bottle containing harmful chemicals or failing to inform the customer what your product really contains.


Environmentalists often use greenwashing to describe the actions of energy and chemical companies, which are traditionally the largest polluters.


Seven Sins Of Greenwashing:


1. The hidden trade-off: “Green-Chemicals” – chemicals containing hazardous ingredients.


2. No proof: Cleaning products claiming to be “certified organic,” but with no verifiable certification.


3. Vagueness: Products claiming to be 100% natural when many naturally occurring substances are hazardous, like arsenic and formaldehyde.


4. Irrelevance: Products claiming to be CFC-free, even though CFCs were banned 20 years ago.


5. Fibbing: Products falsely claiming to be certified by an internationally recognised environmental standard when in truth it is a self fabricated accreditation.


6. Lesser of two evils: Organic cigarettes or “environmentally friendly” pesticides.


7. Worshipping false labels: Committed by a product that, through either words or images, gives the impression of third-party endorsement where no such endorsement actually exists; false graphs, false comparisons and false tests in other words.

7 Sins of Greenwashing